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Photo of a Nuke Explosion Less than 1 Millisecond After Detonation

Photo of a Nuke Explosion Less than 1 Millisecond After Detonation

July 5, 2012 - This might look like some kind of microscopic organism, but it’s actually a high-speed photograph of a nuclear explosion. It was captured less than 1 millisecond after the detonation using a rapatronic camera, which is capable of exposure times as brief as 10 nanoseconds (one nanosecond is one billionth of a second).

The photograph was shot from roughly 7 miles away during the Tumbler-Snapper tests in Nevada (1952). The fireball is roughly 20 meters in diameter, and three times hotter than the surface of the sun.

Pure evil indeed!





( via petapixel.com )



4 comments

  • Savvymalloy#

    Savvymalloy wrote July 6, 2012 3:28:59 AM CEST

    Aaaah... Awesome! Thanks for the info Ricci!

  • Ricci1966#

    Ricci1966 wrote July 6, 2012 2:36:19 AM CEST

    I posted pictures like that in my blog in Dec 31, 2008.
    http://muqui.wordpress.com/2008/12/31/incriveis-fotos-de-uma-explosao-at...
    The lines beneath the blast are steel wires anchoring the tower where the nuke was.

  • Savvymalloy#

    Savvymalloy wrote July 6, 2012 2:13:42 AM CEST

    Also... What's with the warp lines beneath the blast? Were those added later (possibly to add scale to the explosion) or are those natural features of an atomic blast in the nanoseconds after detonation? Interesting *ponders*

  • Savvymalloy#

    Savvymalloy wrote July 6, 2012 1:30:58 AM CEST

    So wait this pic took 60 years to declasify?!?!?! Proof positive that the military always hides technology and information from the general public...

 
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