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Researchers report possible HIV infection cure

Researchers report possible HIV infection cure

June 22, 2011 - Researchers in Germany are reporting that they might have remedied a male of HIV infection. If genuine, that would signify a scientific advance, but not necessarily a remedy advance, explained researchers acquainted with the work.

In the study, published last week online in the journal Blood, researchers at Charite-College Medicine Berlin treated an HIV-contaminated male who also had acute myeloid leukemia -- a cancer of the immune system -- by wiping out his individual immune system with substantial-dose chemotherapy and radiation and supplying him a stem-cell transplant. Stem cells are immature cells that can mature into blood cells.


At the time of the transplant, which occurred in February 2007, he stopped getting anti-HIV drugs.

Why HIV advance is not a universal cure

Thirteen months later on, after a relapse of the leukemia, he underwent a 2nd spherical of remedy followed by another stem-cell transplant from the very same donor.

The donor's stem cells contained a scarce, inherited gene mutation that made them normally resistant to infection with HIV, according to the authors, led by Kristina Allers, who hypothesized that HIV would even so rebound over time. But that has not occurred.

Following three-and-a-50 percent years off of anti-HIV medication, the affected person shows no sign of possibly leukemia or HIV replication and his immune system has been restored to typical health, the scientists documented, concluding, "our results strongly advise that remedy of HIV has been attained in this affected person."

But AIDS scientists predicted the report will have minor effect on practice.

"This possibly is a treatment, but it happens at a bit of a price tag," said Dr. Michael Saag, professor of medicine and director of the College of Alabama at Birmingham AIDS Center.



Sources and more information:

New Approach To Stem Cell Transplants Redirects Lymphocytes From Harming Vital Organs, Without Dangers Of Immunosuppression

Patient Public: Healthcare Prof: An HIV drug that redirects immune cell traffic appears to significantly reduce the dangerous complication graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) in blood cancer patients following allogeneic stem cell transplantation (ASCT), according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of...

HIV drug reduces graft-versus-host disease in stem cell transplant patients

An HIV drug that redirects immune cell traffic appears to significantly reduce the dangerous complication graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) in blood cancer patients following allogeneic stem cell transplantation (ASCT), according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania that will be presented today at...


( via edition.cnn.com )



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