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US Senate Committee Approves Internet "Blacklist" Bill

US Senate Committee Approves Internet "Blacklist" Bill

June 11, 2011 - It seems the lame duck Congressional session is getting anything at all but unproductive. Yesterday, we noticed the cloture of the Foods Protection Modernization Act (S. 510), and today the Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act was unanimously accepted by the US Senate Judiciary Committee Thursday with a 19- vote. The COICA has been overwhelmingly viewed by bloggers as a business hijacking of the Web by mega-media cartels.  Indeed, its eventual passage will be the finish of the free of charge Web as we know it.

The Associated Press noted on the COICA vote:

The Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act, which has the help of the amusement market but has been strongly criticized by electronic rights and other teams, was authorized by a vote of 19-0."Few items are far more essential to the foreseeable future of the American economic system and task generation than defending our intellectual property," stated Senator Patrick Leahy, a Democrat from Vermont who co-sponsored the bill."That is why the laws is supported by the two labor and industry, and Democrats and Republicans are standing together," Leahy explained.

The bill offers the Justice Department an expedited process for cracking down on internet sites engaged in piracy or the sale of counterfeit merchandise like possessing courts issue shutdown orders versus domains based mostly exterior the United States."Rogue web sites are essentially digital merchants marketing illegal and at times harmful products," Leahy explained. "If they existed in the bodily world, the retailer would be shuttered right away and the proprietors would be arrested.""We cannot justification the habits due to the fact it occurs online and the proprietors work abroad," he said. "The Web wants to be free of charge -- not lawless."This laws might be the most harmful weapon towards free of charge speech in modern day background.  The infringing exercise that might land a site on the "Blacklist" is outlined really broadly.  It seems that the blacklist can be enforced without having a court order by way of ISPs.  This is overall information tyranny and all independent voices want to stand up and protest or certainly we'll face the arbitrary blacklist.  David Segal documented on the blacklist polices:

COICA creates two blacklists of World wide web domain names. Courts could add internet sites to the first list the Lawyer Standard would have control over the second. Net service providers and other people (every person from Comcast to PayPal to Google AdSense) would be needed to block any domains on the first list.


Sources and more information:

Censorship of the Internet Takes Center Stage in "Online Infringement" Bill | Electronic Frontier Foundation

Censorship of the Internet Takes Center Stage in "Online Infringement" Bill by Richard Esguerr, eff.org September 21st 2010 Senator Patrick Leahy yesterday introduced the "Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act" (COICA). This flawed bill would allow the Attorney General and the Department of Justice to break the Internet one domain...


( via activistpost.com )


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