Please rate:

Want To Read Others' Thoughts? Try Reading Literary Fiction

Want To Read Others' Thoughts? Try Reading Literary Fiction

October 6, 2013 - Your ability to "read" the thoughts and feelings of others could be affected by the kind of fiction you read.

That's the conclusion of a study in the journal Science that gave tests of social perception to people who were randomly assigned to read excerpts from literary fiction, popular fiction or nonfiction.

On average, people who read parts of more literary books like The Round House by Louise Erdrich did better on those tests than people who read either nothing, read nonfiction or read best-selling popular thrillers like The Sins of the Mother by Danielle Steel.


For example, folks who were assigned to read highbrow literary works did better on a test called "Reading the Mind in the Eyes," which required them to look at black-and-white photographs of actors' eyes and decide what emotion the actors were expressing.

This is the first time scientists have demonstrated the short-term effects of reading on people's social abilities, says Raymond Mar, a psychology researcher at York University in Toronto. He has investigated the effects of reading in the past but did not work on this study.

"I think it's a really interesting paper," says Mar. "It seems to be largely consistent with this growing body of work showing that what we read and our exposure to narrative has a very interesting impact on our social abilities and our ability to understand what other people are thinking and feeling."

People who read book excerpts by National Book Award finalists like Louise Erdrich did better on social perception tests.


Sources and more information:

Novel Finding: Reading Literary Fiction Improves Empathy

How important is reading fiction in socializing school children? Researchers at The New School in New York City have found evidence that literary fiction improves a reader's capacity to understand what others are thinking and feeling. Emanuele Castano, a social psychologist, along with PhD candidate David Kidd conducted five studies in which they...

Reading literary fiction improves 'mind-reading' skills

Now We Have Proof Reading Literary Fiction Makes You a Better Person

"Mind-Reading" Skills Can Be Developed, Perfected by Reading Literary Fiction


( via npr.org )


Recommended




‚Äč  
Visit Disclose.tv on Facebook