The 500-Year-Old Sibiu Manuscript Describes How To Built A Multi-Stage Rocket

The 500-Year-Old Sibiu Manuscript Describes How To Built A Multi-Stage Rocket

The idea of knowing that the present had been predicted years ago has always been a propelling thought. What if there was solid evidence that an instance of past-to-present prediction could true, and that it lies in ancient writings that were discovered in 1961.

The Manuscripts That Defy Time

The Sibiu manuscript is known to have spoken about liquid fuel and multi-stage rockets along with their construction. A lot of people are skeptical when it comes to hearing things that contradict everything they've ever known about their present but much to their skepticism, the 450-page manuscripts were found by a professor over sixty years ago in Romania and do in fact exist.

Doru Todericu discovered writings and drawings that depicted early artillery, ballistics and multistage rockets. Although it was discovered in the 60s, many speculate that the words and language used may date back even further than the 16th century. No one knows who is truly responsible for the manuscripts themselves, but a man named Conrad Haas has been credited for this amazing stride in history, and also as the first person to conceptualize multistage rockets. He was said to be an Austrian or Transylvanian Saxon military engineer who is befitting considering his sketches and ideas. The manuscript theoretically positions a new take on technology that had not been recorded around that time in history, thus creating an enigmatic cast over itself which may deter onlookers.

Conrad Haas Sibiu Rocket

Written entirely in German, the origin of the document remains a mystery despite its appearance in Romania, and many still believe the claims to be a farce. Without documented proof, it is impossible to support additional claims of people who say there were rocket launches and physical constructions of Haas' rockets. Nonetheless, there have been individuals early in history who have achieved similar things such as publishing details about rocketry and what it entails but never in a documented and finessed document that not only provides evidence of early idealization of modern day technology but the thoughts of the man who created it. The skepticism behind the manuscripts are warranted considering the number of smokes and mirrors that cloud our news today, but they are something worth looking into. They are worth learning about.

Conrad Haas Sibiu Rocket

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